New Jersey Counties

New Jersey Counties

Middlesex County

Middlesex County

Middlesex County is a county located in north-central New Jersey, United States. As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county’s population was 842,798, making it the state’s second-most populous county,[4][5][6] an increase of 4.1% from the 2010 United States Census, when its population was enumerated at 809,858,[3] making it the second-most populous county in the state.[7][8] Middlesex is part of the New York metropolitan area, and its county seat is New Brunswick.[2] The center of population of the state of New Jersey is located in Middlesex County, in East Brunswick Township, just east of the New Jersey Turnpike.[9] The 2000 Census showed that the county ranked 63rd in the United States among the highest-income counties by median household.[10] The Bureau of Economic Analysis ranked the county as having the 143rd-highest per capita income of all 3,113 counties in the United States (and the 10th-highest in New Jersey) as of 2009.[11] Middlesex County holds the nickname, “The Greatest County in the Land”.[1] The county was primarily settled due to its ideal location near the Raritan River[12] and was established as of March 7, 1683, as part of the Province of East Jersey and was partitioned as of October 31, 1693, into the townships of Piscataway, Perth Amboy and Woodbridge. Somerset County was established on May 14, 1688, from portions of Middlesex County.[13] The county’s first court met in June 1683 in Piscataway, and held session at alternating sites over the next century in Perth Amboy, Piscataway and Woodbridge before relocating permanently to New Brunswick in 1778.[14] Middlesex County hosts an extensive park system totaling more than 6,300 acres (2,500 ha).[15]

Monmouth

Monmouth County is a county located in Central New Jersey, in the United States within the New York metropolitan area, and the northernmost county along the Jersey Shore. As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county’s population was 626,351, making it the state’s fifth-most populous county,[3][4][5] representing a decrease of 0.6% from the 2010 Census, when the population was enumerated at 630,380,[2] in turn an increase of 15,079 from 615,301 at the 2000 Census.[6] As of 2010, the county fell to the fifth-most populous county in the state, having been surpassed by Hudson County.[7][8] Its county seat is Freehold Borough.[1] The most populous place was Middletown Township, with 66,522 residents at the time of the 2010 Census, while Howell Township covered 61.21 square miles (158.5 km2), the largest total area of any municipality.[8] In 2015, the county had a per capita personal income of $69,410, the fifth-highest in New Jersey and ranked 74th of 3,113 counties in the United States.[9][10] Monmouth County ranked 38th among the highest-income counties in the United States as of 2011, placing it among the top 1.2% of counties by wealth.[11] As of 2009, it was ranked 56th in the United States by personal per-capita income.[12]

Somerset

Somerset County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county’s population was 335,432,[6] a 3.7% increase from the 2010 United States Census, making it the 13th-most populous of the state’s 21 counties.[7][4] Somerset County is part of the New York Metropolitan Area. Its county seat is Somerville.[3] The most populous place was Franklin Township, with 62,300 residents at the time of the 2010 Census, while Hillsborough Township, covered 55.00 square miles (142.4 km2), the largest total area of any municipality.[8] In 2015, the county had a per capita personal income of $86,468, the second-highest in New Jersey and ranked 25th of 3,113 counties in the United States.[9][10] Somerset County, as of the 2000 Census, was the seventh-wealthiest county in the United States by median household income at $76,933 (third in New Jersey behind Hunterdon County at $79,888 and Morris County at $77,340), fourth in median family income at $90,655 (second in New Jersey behind Hunterdon County at $91,050) and ranked seventh by per capita income at $37,970 (highest in New Jersey).[11] The Bureau of Economic Analysis ranked the county as having the 11th-highest per capita income of all 3,113 counties in the United States (and the highest in New Jersey) as of 2009.[12] In 2012, 49.8 percent of Somerset County residents were college graduates, the highest percentage in the state.[13] Somerset County was recently ranked number 3 of 21 NJ counties as one of the healthiest counties in New Jersey, according to an annual report by County Health Rankings and Roadmaps.[14] Somerset County was created on May 14, 1688, from portions of Middlesex County.

Union

Union County is a county in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county’s population was 563,892, making it the seventh-most populous of the state’s 21 counties,[5][6][7] an increase of 5.1% from the 2010 United States Census, when its population was enumerated at 536,499,[4] in turn an increase of 13,958 (2.7%) from the 522,541 enumerated in the 2000 Census.[8] In 2010, Union County slipped to the seventh-most populous county in the state, having been surpassed by Ocean County.[9][10] Union County is part of the New York metropolitan area. Its county seat is Elizabeth.[3] In 2015, the county had a per capita personal income of $60,089, the seventh-highest in New Jersey and ranked 152nd of 3,113 counties in the United States.[11][12] The Bureau of Economic Analysis ranked the county as having the 119th-highest per capita income of all 3,113 counties in the United States (and the eighth-highest in New Jersey) in 2009.[13] A study by Forbes.com determined that Union County pays the second-highest property taxes of all U.S. counties, based on 2007 data.[14] With a population density of 4,955 people per square mile (water excluded), Union County was the 15th-most densely populated county in America as of the 2010 Census, and third-densest in New Jersey, behind Hudson County (ranked 6th nationwide at 9,754 per square mile) and Essex County (ranked 11th at 6,126).[15][16]

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Bergen

Bergen County is the most populous county in the U.S. state of New Jersey.[4] As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county’s population was 948,406, an increase of 4.8% from the 2010 United States Census,[3][6][7] which in turn represented an increase of 20,998 (2.4%) from the 884,118 counted in the 2000 Census.[8] Located in the northeastern corner of New Jersey and its Gateway Region, Bergen County is part of the New York City Metropolitan Area and is directly across the Hudson River from Manhattan, to which it is connected by the George Washington Bridge. Bergen County is divided into 70 municipalities, but has no large cities. Its most populous place, with 43,010 residents at the time of the 2010 census, is Hackensack,[9] which is also its county seat.[2] Mahwah covered the largest area of any municipality, at 26.19 square miles (67.8 km2).[9] In 2015, the county had a per capita personal income of $75,849, the fourth-highest in New Jersey and ranked 45th of 3,113 counties in the United States.[10][11] Bergen County is one of the wealthiest counties in the United States, with a median household income of $81,708 per the 2010 Census, increasing to an estimated $84,677 in 2014, which was almost 18% higher than the $71,919 median statewide.[12] The county hosts an extensive park system totaling nearly 9,000 acres (3,600 ha).[13]

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Burlington County

Burlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. The county is the second largest in New Jersey by total area behind Ocean County which has a total area of 915.40 sq mi [6] and its county seat is Mount Holly.[1] As of the 2017 Census Bureau estimate, the county’s population was 448,596, making it the 11th-largest of the state’s 21 counties, representing a 0.1% decrease[3][4][5] from the 2010 United States Census, when the population was enumerated at 448,734,[2] in turn an increase of 25,340 (6.0%) from the 423,394 enumerated in the 2000 Census.[7] The most-populous place was Evesham Township, with 45,538 residents at the time of the 2010 Census, while Washington Township covered 102.71 square miles (266.0 km2), the largest total area of any municipality in Burlington County.[6] In 2015, the county had a per capita personal income of $55,227, the tenth-highest in New Jersey and ranked 228th of 3,113 counties in the United States.[8][9] The Bureau of Economic Analysis ranked the county as having the 158th-highest per capita income of all 3,113 counties in the United States (and the 11th-highest in New Jersey) as of 2009.[10] Burlington County is part of the Delaware Valley area, located east of the Delaware River. However, the county stretches across the state, and its southeast corner reaches tidal estuaries leading to southern New Jersey’s Great Bay, which separates the county from the Atlantic Ocean.

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Essex

Essex County is a county in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county’s population was 808,285, making it the state’s third-most populous county,[4][5][6] an increase of 3.1% from the 2010 United States Census, when its population was enumerated at 783,969,[3] in turn a decrease of 1.2% (9,664 fewer residents) from the 793,633 enumerated in the 2000 Census.[7] In 2010, the county dropped down to third-largest, behind Middlesex County, and was one of only two counties in the state to see a decline between 2000 and 2010 (Cape May County being the other).[8][9] Its county seat is Newark.[2] It is part of the New York Metropolitan Area. In 2015, the county had a per capita personal income of $60,030, the eighth-highest in New Jersey and ranked 153rd of 3,113 counties in the United States.[10][11] The Bureau of Economic Analysis ranked the county as having the 94th-highest per capita income of all 3,113 counties in the United States (and the seventh-highest in New Jersey) as of 2009.[12]

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Hudson County

Hudson County, a county in the U.S. state of New Jersey, lies west of the lower Hudson River, which was named for Henry Hudson, the sea captain who explored the area in 1609.[4] Part of New Jersey’s Gateway Region in the New York metropolitan area, Jersey City is its largest city and county seat.[1] As of the 2017 Census estimate, Hudson County was the fastest-growing county in New Jersey compared to 2010; the county’s population was 691,643, making it the state’s 4th-most populous county,[3][5][6] an increase of 9.0% from the 2010 United States Census, when its population was enumerated at 634,266,[2] in turn an increase of 25,291 (+4.2%) from the 608,975 enumerated in the 2000 Census.[7] Hudson County is the fourth-most populous county in the state.[8][9] Hudson County is the geographically smallest and most densely populated county in New Jersey and the sixth-most densely populated county in the United States, with 13,731.4 residents per square mile of total area in 2010,[10] and 14,973.9 per square mile in 2017.

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Hunterdon County

Hunterdon County is a county located in the western section of the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county’s population was 125,059, making it the state’s 18th-most populous county,[3][4][5]representing a 2.6% decrease from the 128,349 enumerated in the 2010 United States Census,[2] in turn increasing by 6,360 (+5.2%) from the 121,989 counted in the 2000 Census,[6] retaining its position as the state’s 14th-most populous county. The percentage increase in population between 2000 and 2010 was the largest in New Jersey, almost triple the statewide increase of 4.5%, and the absolute increase in residents was the third highest.[7] It is part of the New York Metropolitan Area. Its county seat is Flemington.[1] In 2015, the county had a per capita personal income of $80,759, the third-highest in New Jersey and ranked 33rd of 3,113 counties in the United States.[8][9] The Bureau of Economic Analysis ranked the county as having the 19th-highest per capita income of all 3,113 counties in the United States (and the highest in New Jersey) as of 2009.[10] Hunterdon County is noted for having the second-lowest level of child poverty of any county in the United States.[11] It is part of the Newark-Union, NJ-PA Metropolitan Division of the New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA Metropolitan Statistical Area.[12][13] Hunterdon County was established on March 11, 1714, separating from Burlington County, at which time it included all of present-day Morris, Sussex and Warren counties.[14] The rolling hills and rich soils which produce bountiful agricultural crops drew Native American tribes and then Europeans to the area.

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Mercer County

Mercer County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. Its county seat is Trenton, the state capital.[2] The county constitutes the Trenton-Ewing, NJ Metropolitan Statistical Area[5] and is considered part of the New York Metropolitan Area by the United States Census Bureau,[6][7] but also directly borders the Philadelphia metropolitan area and is included within the Federal Communications Commission’s Philadelphia Designated Market Area.[8] As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county’s population was 374,733, making it the state’s 12th-most populous county,[4][9][10] an increase of 2.2% from the 2010 United States Census, when its population was enumerated at 366,513,[3] in turn an increase of 15,752 (4.5%) from the 350,761 enumerated in the 2000 Census,[11] retaining its position as the 12th-most populous county in the state.[12][13] In 2015, the county had a per capita personal income of $63,247, the sixth-highest in New Jersey and ranked 121st of 3,113 counties in the United States.[14][15] Mercer County stands among the highest-income counties in the United States, with the Bureau of Economic Analysis having ranked the county as having the 78th-highest per capita income of all 3,113 counties in the United States (and the sixth-highest in New Jersey) as of 2009.[16] The county was formed by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 22, 1838, from portions of Burlington County (including Nottingham Township), Hunterdon County (including Ewing Township, Lawrence Township, Trenton City and portions of Hopewell Township), and Middlesex County (including West Windsor Township and portions of East Windsor Township).[17] The old Keith Line bisects the county and is the boundary between municipalities that previously had been separated into West Jersey and East Jersey. It was named for Continental Army General Hugh Mercer, who died as a result of wounds received at the Battle of Princetonon January 3, 1777.[18] The Mercer Oak, against which the dying general rested as his men continued to fight, appears on the county seal and stood for 250 years until it collapsed in 2000.[19] Mercer County is home to Princeton University, Princeton Theological Seminary, the Institute for Advanced Study, Rider University, The College of New Jersey, Thomas Edison State University and Mercer County Community College.[20] The official residence of the governor of New Jersey, known as Drumthwacket, is located in Princeton, and is listed on both the U.S. National Register of Historic Places and the New Jersey Register of Historic Places.

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Morris County

Morris County /ˈmɒrɪs/ is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey, about 25 mi (40 km) west of New York City. According to the 2010 United States Census, the population was 492,276,[2] up from the 470,212 at the 2000 Census, As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county’s population was 499,693, making it the state’s 10th-most populous county, and marking a 1.5% increase from 2010.[3][7][8] The county is part of the New York Metropolitan Area, and its county seat is Morristown. The most populous place was Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, with 53,238 residents at the time of the 2010 Census, while Rockaway Township covered 45.55 square miles (118.0 km2), the largest total area of any municipality. In 2015, the county had a per capita personal income of $86,582, the highest in New Jersey and ranked 24th of 3,113 counties in the United States.[10][11] Morris County, as of the 2000 Census, was the sixth-wealthiest county in the United States by median household income at $77,340 (second in New Jersey behind Hunterdon County at $79,888), sixth in median family income at $89,773 (third in New Jersey behind Hunterdon County at $91,050 and Somerset County at $90,605) and ranked tenth by per capita income at $36,964 (second in New Jersey behind Somerset County at $37,970)[12] The Bureau of Economic Analysis ranked the county as having the 16th-highest per capita income of all 3,113 counties in the United States (and the second highest in New Jersey) as of 2009.[13] The county ranked third in the New York Metropolitan area in terms of median income.[14]

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Ocean County

Ocean County is a county located along the Jersey Shore in the U.S. state of New Jersey. Its county seat is Toms River.[2] Since 1990, Ocean County has been one of New Jersey’s fastest-growing counties. As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county’s population was 597,943, a 3.7% increase from the 576,567 enumerated in the 2010 United States Census,[4] making Ocean the state’s sixth-most populous county.[4][5][6] The 2010 population figure represented an increase of 65,651 (+12.8%) from the 2000 Census population of 510,916,[7] as Ocean surpassed Union County to become the sixth-most populous county in the state. Ocean County was also the fastest growing county in New Jersey between 2000 and 2010 in terms of increase in the number of residents and second-highest in percentage growth.[8] Ocean County was established on February 15, 1850, from portions of Monmouth County, with the addition of Little Egg Harbor Township which was annexed from Burlington County on March 30, 1891.[1] The most populous place was Lakewood Township, with 92,843 residents at the time of the 2010 Census (up 32,491 since 2000, the largest population increase of any municipality in the state), while Jackson Township, covered 100.62 square miles (260.6 km2), the largest total area of any municipality in the county.[9] Ocean County is located 50 miles (80 km) east of Philadelphia, 70 miles (110 km) south of New York City, and 25 miles (40 km) north of Atlantic City, making it a prime destination for residents of these cities during the summer. As with the entire Jersey Shore, summer traffic routinely clogs local roadways throughout the season. Ocean County is part of the New York metropolitan area but is also home to many tourist attractions frequently visited by Delaware Valley residents, especially the beachfront communities of Seaside Heights, Long Beach Island, Point Pleasant Beach, as well as Six Flags Great Adventure, which is the home of the world’s tallest and second-fastest roller coaster, Kingda Ka. Ocean County is also a gateway to New Jersey’s Pine Barrens, one of the largest protected pieces of land on the East Coast.